Tag Archives: work-life balance

The Power of Discomfort in Learning Medicine

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If you don’t like what you’re learning, look even closer.

TL;DR

  • Dave asks his co-hosts to think about the role of discomfort in learning. It’s a signal that you need to pay very close attention, both to the topic and to why you feel that way.
  • Listener Michelina, an undergrad mom with a full-time job, asks if her COVID-affected grades mean she should extend her time in college to seek a toxicology degree or just stick with biology.
  • The discussion on working during medical school continues, as Michelina wonders if she can work full time while she balances motherhood and med school.

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NOT EVERYTHING NEEDS TO BE MEANINGFUL, Y’ALL.

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The Meaning of Purposelessness

On This Episode:

Join this week’s co-hosts M4 Madeline Cusimano, M3 Nathen Spitz, M3 Mason LaMarche, and M4 Ananya Munjal for the show!

  • Facing a content-free episode, we discuss what medical students do when they’re avoiding purpose and meaning (ie., they want to just have fun).
  • We discuss a more nuanced view of work-life balance in medicine than is usually discussed (referenced: this Medscape article).
  • Madeline challenges the gang to play 5-second rule, Medicine Edition.
  • Bonus: As many tangents and asides as we can fit into an hour.
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Background: https://www.flickr.com/photos/89396956@N00/

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Which is More Important: the MCAT or Your Job?

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Should you put your life on hold for the MCAT?

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Photo by Gene Hunt

As a planned parenthood sex educator, listener T’keyah wants to know what medical schools teach about meeting the needs of LGBTQIA+ patients.  Amy Young, Patrick Brau, Liza Mann, and Teneme Konne can’t, of course speak for all medical schools, but they can speak about what they are learning: quite a lot, not least because we have an LGBTQ clinic they can rotate on!  T’keyah snuck a second question in, too: she loves her job, and it’s important work.  So, is the advice she’s gotten to stop working while studying for the MCAT valid?

This Week’s Medical News

A study out of the UK says that men of advanced paternal age (ahem, forty or older) tend to father geekier boys: smart, focused, and unconcerned about what people think of them.  And we took note of an column this week on why doctors swear so much.  Hint: it’s not all sunshine and roses, being a physician.  With this in mind it is only logical that, in the name of science, Dave has his co-hosts stick their hands in ice water and recite Dr. Seuss.  Will they be able to withstand the ethically induced pain?

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Thank you, T’keyah for your question!  If you have something to say or a question to ask, call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

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From Oakland to Iowa City to Silicon Valley: Founding a Tech Startup in Med School

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Terrence Wong
Terrence Wong

Terrence Wong is not your average medical student.  Growing up in Oakland, California, he didn’t have opportunities or connections.  And a lack of resources meant that even as a little tyke he looked for ways to make money, like selling stuff on the Internet.   He’s since realized that there are others out there who could use some information and encouragement–mentorship–to help them achieve what he did: going from poor inner-city kid to student at a top medical school.  So he and some friends with serious coding chops founded MedMentor  to hook up pre-meds with medical students who can serve as mentors, and to bring more diversity to a profession that sorely needs it.   Terrence and Dave talked about what it’s been like to be both a medical student and a startup founder, and how listening to what ‘they’ think of your crazy idea is pretty much the last thing you should do.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine; nor do they reflect the views of anyone other than the people who expressed them.  If you have feedback on anything you hear on the show, positive or not, let us know.