Category Archives: Short Coat Podcast

All episodes of the Short Coat Podcast.

What Medicine Really Needs from Artificial Intelligence, ft. Ilana Yurkiewicz (pt. 2)

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Bringing the healthcare pieces together

  • Dr. Ilana Yurkiewicz, co-director of Stanford University’s Primary Care for Cancer Survivorship Program, author, and science journalist, returns to continue our discussion from November 9 about our fragmented health system and what can be done about it.
  • M2 Jeff Goddard, M1s Fallon Jung and Alex Nigg, and MD/PhD student Jacqueline Nielson talk with her about what’s missing from the medical safety nets that help low SES patients get emergency care, what kind of AI we really need to bind pieces of of the system together (hint: AIs that offer differential diagnoses and other doctor stuff probably isn’t it!), and the need for continuous incremental change in medicine.
  • If we’re ever going to get there, she says, we need a collaborative approach with involvement from various stakeholders in healthcare, including patients, healthcare workers, programmers, insurance companies, and policymakers. The aim: to move medicine from a fee-for-service model to one that is driven by the actual value doctors provide their patients (and that removes bureaucratic burdens instead of creates them).

More about our guest:

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).
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Continue reading What Medicine Really Needs from Artificial Intelligence, ft. Ilana Yurkiewicz (pt. 2)

How Studying Changes from Premed to Clnicals (Recess Rehash)

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[All Dave’s co-hosts were busy doing med student things when it came time to record, but it’s okay–they told him to just post a rerun. Enjoy!]

What you get away with as an undergrad won’t serve you in med school.

  • M2s Jacob and Maddie, M4 Mason and new co-host PA2 Mark take us through how they changed their study habits from undergrad through the clinical years.
  • Dave reads an old German folktale about how to become a doctor. Hint: it’s harder today, and involves much less mansplaining, but there’s at least one feature that still exists from antiquity.

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).

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Continue reading How Studying Changes from Premed to Clnicals (Recess Rehash)

The Practicalities of Policy; Alex Trebot Returns

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Democracy is messy

  • Dave declared this recording day to be “Effort Free Friday,” as it was officially Thanksgiving Break! That didn’t stop M2 Jeff Goddard from telling the story of a recent meeting of the AMA Students Section that offered an object lesson on how policy is (or in this case, isn’t) made.
  • Among many other topics, some students wanted the AMA to declare a position on the current Israel-Hamas war. In the end, the AMA declined to do so, perhaps deciding that it didn’t have the political capital on a divisive issue that could threaten its ability to participate in other conversations it has a more direct role in. Co-hosts M2 Happy Kumar, MD/PhD student Faith Goddard, and MD/PhD student Riley Behan Bush talk about their personal efforts to understand this compilated issue.
  • In the spirit of the tenets of Effort Free Friday, Dave dragged Alex Trebot out from the AI closet to host a trivia contest.

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).
We want to know more about you: Take the Listener Survey
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Continue reading The Practicalities of Policy; Alex Trebot Returns

Top-notch Residents, Emergency Room Violence

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The Critical Qualities to Ace Residency Interviews and Thrive in Medical Careers

A recent MedPage Today editorial shines a light on four traits that are crucial for every resident. These elements aren’t traditionally taught, but are key for future doctors. They encompass selflessness, optimism, personal responsibility, and a hunger for personal meaning. M4 Alex Belzer, who’s currently interviewing, and M2s Hend Al-Kaylani and Eric Vallin break them down, exploring how each can enhance both personal and professional interactions.

And a New York Times editorial video tackles a darker side of medical practice – violence against emergency medicine providers. The challenges faced chuck yet another curveball into the complex reality of a physician’s work-life, the erosion of human connection in healthcare, and the necessity to spark change.

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).
We want to know more about you: Take the Listener Survey
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Sleeper Specialties: Nuclear Medicine

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Medicine, Work-Life Balance, and Physics, together at last

Dr. Michael Graham, a seasoned Nuclear Medicine practitioner and professor at the University of Iowa, reached out to us recently because at a national level his specialty is experiencing a shortage of new residents. The reasons for this include a less-than-perfect fit with the way it’s traditionally been lumped into radiology, a field with some parallels but some important training differences.

M1 Fallon Jung, PA1s Olivia Quinby and Noah Vasquez, and M2 Jeff Goddard talk with Dr. Graham about how the field has evolved and changed the dynamics of patient care and medical practice.

Decoding Nuclear Medicine with Dr. Michael Graham

For those in the dark, nuclear medicine is the area of medical practice that uses radioisotopes for diagnosis and, increasingly, treatment. The secret weapon is the ability to see bodily function and metabolism unlike routine imaging.

One reason we think nuke med is a sleeper specialty is lifestyle–compared to some of the more procedural specialties like surgery or OB, there is a more regular schedule on offer. Dr. Graham suggests that those who might find a good fit with nuke med studied engineering or physical sciences, and he offers some pointers for students considering a career in nuclear medicine and how it intersects with the broader field of radiology.

Touching on future trends in healthcare, we discussed newer ‘theranostic’ agents – a combination of therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. This rapid and promising development offers targeted treatment – increasing effectiveness while minimizing side effects.

Ensuring Work-Life Balance

Dr. Graham also helps us answer listener Molly’s question: how do medical students and doctors achieve a balance between their work and their personal lives. The balance in nuke med, as Dr. Graham highlights, can be somewhat smoother than in other medical specialties.

More about our guest:

Website: https://medicine.uiowa.edu/radiology/profile/michael-graham

Continue reading Sleeper Specialties: Nuclear Medicine

Piecing Together American Healthcare, ft. Dr. Ilana Yurkiewicz (Part 1)

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We have GOT to get it together

What’s the best way to navigate a fragmented healthcare system? How are patients both the victims and unwitting custodians of their own medical stories? And can primary care address gaps in long-term cancer treatment? We had a fun conversation with Dr. Ilana Yurkiewicz, the author of ‘Fragmented, A Doctor’s Quest to Piece Together American Healthcare.’ Jeff, Fallon, AJ, and Alex walked away not only enlightened about the gaps in the contemporary healthcare system but also the importance of primary care and specialists working together to build patient relationships and keep clinical information flowing.

The Primary Care Revelation

Dr. Yurkiewicz took an unconventional career path. Why would a trained medical oncologist with board certifications in hematology and oncology choose to open a primary care practice for cancer patients and survivors, you might wonder? The answer delves deep into the very core of our healthcare system’s inefficiencies.

Cancer treatment doesn’t end at remission. The aftermath brings a basket full of new health issues that often go overlooked. During these critical times, patients need primary care doctors who are also knowledgeable about oncology — enter the innovative primary care practice Dr. Yurkiewicz established.

Fixing Fragmentation in Healthcare

Unfortunately, the tools physicians use to track their patients’ progress aren’t great at sharing. The shortcomings of electronic medical records (EMR) are a source of frustration that healthcare providers commonly face due to their disjointed nature. Keeping the patient in the loop when it comes to their reports and critical information was highlighted as a key responsibility of healthcare providers in a fragmented system–the current state of affairs is that the patient is the one with the most incentive to keep track of their data! This only highlights the urgent need for an interconnected EMR system, that patients are often the only source of continuity in their healthcare narrative.

A Glimpse Into the Future of Healthcare

There are countries that do this better, but modifying the existing system rather than attempting to building a new one from scratch based on them may be tough. Though countries like the Netherlands boast more streamlined healthcare systems, it’s crucial to devise a model that accommodates the unique challenges and strengths of American healthcare and culture.

More about our guest:

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).
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Continue reading Piecing Together American Healthcare, ft. Dr. Ilana Yurkiewicz (Part 1)

Selfie-Diagnosis, Fentanyl Anti-Doses

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  • Dave’s been seeing a lot of videos on social media that suggest “You might have {insert condition} if you {insert experience or behavior that most people have or do to some degree}.” Which is great–it’s always nice to know that you are not alone, that your experience is not unique. But how should physicians work with a social media self-diagnosis?
  • There may some day be a vaccine against fentanyl, meant to protect against overdoses. This is great news, if it works out, because people die from fentanyl overdose every day. Who will get it, what affect it will have on anesthesia, and the parallels to how people view HPV vaccines will among the things we’ll be watching.
  • And Dave has co-hosts Jeff, Jacqueline, Faith, and Riley practice their doctoring on each other.

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).
We want to know more about you: Take the Listener Survey
We do more things on…

Continue reading Selfie-Diagnosis, Fentanyl Anti-Doses

Health Is An Outfit That Looks Different On Every Body

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Do docs and patients mean the same thing when they talk about ‘health?’

Fallon, Sri, Radha, and Kait discuss the concept of ‘health.’ What does healthy mean to our patients? What does it mean to physicians? The definition has changed over time–from freedom from disease to a more self-actualizing concept of thriving in one’s circumstances. Even the normal body temp of 37 degrees C is changing! Is nothing sacred?

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).
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Continue reading Health Is An Outfit That Looks Different On Every Body

TB Eradication, mRNA Vindication

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What it takes to make changes in medicine

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).


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Med-Techbros, Shortage Woes, and Ig Nobel Probes

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  • As another physician shortage looms, M2s Jeff and Olivia and M1 Fallon look at the reasons–the market forces, political issues, and the missing incentives. There is some good news–a shortage of physicians means that residents get a ton of solicitations for post-training jobs.
  • Elon Musk’s Neuralink might be bad for monkeys, but the FDA has cleared the way for human trials to begin. What place do techbros–who have a rep for “moving fast and breaking things”– have in medicine where lives are at stake?
  • And Dave gives a pop quiz on this year’s Ig Nobel Prize winners.

We Want to Hear From You: YOUR VOICE MATTERS!

No matter where you fall on any spectrum, we want your thoughts on our show.  Do you agree or disagree with something we said today?  Did you hear something really helpful?  Are we delivering a podcast you want to keep listening to?  We’ll be sure your ideas are heard by all–leave a message at 347-SHORTCT (347-746-7828) and we’ll put your message in a future episode (use *67 to be an “Unknown caller”).

We want to know more about you: Take the Listener Survey

We do more things on…

Continue reading Med-Techbros, Shortage Woes, and Ig Nobel Probes