Tag Archives: Kylie Miller

Sacrifice It All to be A Med Student? Don’t Do It!

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Med School Requires Sacrifice…but not of everything.

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Photo by Andrew Turner

Listener Arman  is starting school this fall, and is feeling something many do at the start of this journey: that in order to succeed, he’ll have to do nothing but study.  Will he’ll have to sacrifice his outside interests to succeed? Kylie Miller, Matt Wilson, Teneme Konne and Patrick Brau admit that medical students love to talk about how hard it is and how much time they give to their new lives.  To be sure, sacrifice is a part of learning to be a doctor.  But they do have reassuring words for those who worry their identities are about to be ransacked.  Plus, Yahoo! Answers leave us with more questions than we started with…like, did the fruit fly regain consciousness?

This Week’s Medical News…

We also discuss a study from Sweden that looks at whether drones can deliver life-saving automatic emergency defibrillators to heart attack victims faster than EMS can get to them.  And we explore the power of names to get you to eat your vegetables.

We want to hear from you.

If you have fears to be assuaged, and think we are the best people to do so, give us a call! Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

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Medical School Secondary Applications: What Do They Want?

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How to Think About Medical School Secondary Applications

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Good lord, she wore him out. Photo by Doug Kline

A listener wants to know more about how best to approach medical school secondary applications.  Given the the turnaround time often recommended (a week), how important are they? Do they need to be as well crafted as your personal statement?  What do schools get out of them?  And are they just a way for schools to extract more money from applicants?  We asked our medical school’s admissions staff for answers to these questions so you can get on with crafting your best possible application.  And JC writes in to say nice things, including that he wants to start his own show when he matriculates this fall.  Go, JC, GO!

This week in science and medicine news

One major destination for patients’ medical dollars is the emergency room visit.  One recent study asks what do docs know about the costs of caring for some common complaints they see in the ER?  Turns out, not much…but when doctors are in charge of knowing the costs of care, is the patient really helped?

Meanwhile, a startup in (where else) California wants to charge $8000 to give old people young blood, because we need more dystopian sci-fi concepts.

And a discussion on the problems people can experience surrounding orgasms reveals something about Kylie that would have made Jim Henson blush.

We want to hear from you

We LOVE hearing from you, and we really try to  answer your questions.  If you have something to say or a question to ask, call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

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You can buy that on Amazon?

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All work and no play…is not what we do.

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If you’re buying this on the internet, you have a job planning for disasters, or there is something wrong with you. There are no in-betweens. Photo by CocteauBoy

Sometimes you’re having so much fun that the time flies by and you forget that you have other important things to do.  That’s what happened on this week’s show, in which Dave brings Aditi Patel, Aline Sandouk, Kylie Miller and Irene Morcuende along for a trip through the medical supplies section of Amazon.  Can they guess what the medical device is based on the reviews alone?

This week in science and medicine news

We did get to talk about one bit of medical news, pointed out to us on twitter by AJtha808Scientist: the fact that Iowa made national news by forcing the closure of 1/4 of its Planned Parenthood clinics.  Thanks for the tip!

We want to hear from you

We also heard from Hannah of Jackson Hole, Wyoming.  She wrote in to let us know why, according to the study we discussed in our last show about longevity in US counties, her beautiful corner of the country is so damn healthy.  Spoiler: it doesn’t involve sitting on the couch and eating chips like Dave was hoping.  Listeners, share your suggestions with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

Continue reading You can buy that on Amazon?

Premeds Can Be Science Podcasters, ft. Terel Jackson

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Medical and Premedical students should definitely podcast

A picture of Pre-med Podcaster Terel Jackson
Pre-med Podcaster Terel Jackson

An unstated goal of ours is to show medical learners that podcasting is a beneficial experience for both listeners and hosts,  and we’re always banging on about the need for better science communicators.  So Erin Pazaski, Levi Endelman, Kylie Miller, and Irene Morcuende were recently excited to get an email from Terel Jackson, an OSU premed who said she had gotten the message and started her podcast!  Her show, Health Science (For The Rest of Us), takes “a super practical look at the body, its shenanigans, and the world of fascinating ways we try to keep it healthy.”  Of course, we had to have her on the show to tell us all about her adventures in radiation, body odor, neti pots, and more.  She also has some tips for people who want to make podcasting a part of their journey to medical school and beyond.

This week in science and medicine news

Also, we discuss new research showing how Americans’ lifespans vary widely by up to 20 years from county to county. Plus, the unusual prescription one PA hospital writes to save diabetic patients an average of $24,000 a year.

We want to hear from you

Listeners, share your suggestions with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

Continue reading Premeds Can Be Science Podcasters, ft. Terel Jackson

Real, and Fake, Research Day

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Photo by Arenamontanus

We’ve got a crowd of M1s in the house rapidly approaching the end of their first year.  This past week, Kylie Jade Miller, Levi Endelman, Adam Erwood, and new co-host Irene Morcuende took their physical exam skills practical exam; and they discussed some research they did at the intersections of medical and society–the public health implications of the American-as-apple-pie cycle of  incarceration, the effects of Medicare expansion have had on access to mental healthcare, what happens when substance abuse sufferers are offered clean needle and Narcan, and whether taxing sugary drinks have an effect on obesity.  Dave, seeing an opportunity to torture his co-hosts, put them through a Pop Quiz: can they discern if the research he presents to them is real or from the depths of Dave’s mind? Kylie uses the occasion to let her secret gunner out.  Listeners, we offer free advice!  Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, or email us at theshortoats@gmail.com.

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Cardiothoracic Surgery: A Woman’s World, For Dr. Sharon Larson

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Secret weapon for future surgeons. Photo by drumcircles.net

Dr. Sharon Larson is Iowa’s first female cardiothoracic surgeon.  You might be forgiven for thinking that Iowa’s been a bit backwards for not having had this glass ceiling broken sooner, but there aren’t exactly a surplus of women who’ve sought out this demanding career.  In the United States, only 5% of CT surgeons are women in this already-tiny specialty.  When Dave read about her in the local paper, he figured she’d be a great guest for Kylie Miller, Philip Huang, Hadeal Ayoub, and Erin Pazaski to talk with about things like glass ceilings and how women succeed in a man’s world. Turns out, Dave was right–she’s a great guest to talk to about the long road to becoming an attending in her field, what male surgeons should know about female surgeons and vice versa, and how a woman might find she and her friends taking golf lessons to prove a point. Listeners, when you talk to us, we do our best work.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

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Happy Glitches, Research Niches, and Doc Dash Pitches

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Photo by PetroleumJelliffe

This week we start with some feedback from listener Paulius, who has a suggestion for a future show on the unsung heroes of primary care.  Thank you!  Dave bats the idea around with John Pienta, Kylie Miller, Tarek Karam and Elizabeth Shirazi.  Meanwhile, as biomedical science grapples with a study-replication crisis perhaps caused by structural problems that discourage repetition in favor of novel findings and breakthroughs, we consider the advice of Ioannis Yannas, one of the inventors of artificial skin.  Are cat lovers really at risk for schizophrenia?  A large UK study says piffle, although cat-lover Kylie points out that there are some caveats.  And though Tarek and Kylie are well-behaved on the mic, their individual approaches to weather-related flight delays reveal some points of contention. Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and ask us questions on Fridays at noon as we record the show while broadcasting on Facebook Live!

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Coming From a Medical Family

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Certainly not! Hurrumph. Photo by DrPhotoMoto

On Inauguration Day, listener Tekia (and we hope that’s spelled right) called to let us know that we were helping her stay frosty.  Another listener, Liza, wrote wondering if her peers with MD family members are at an advantage in medical school.  Co-hosts John Pienta and Adam Erwood (who have physicians in their immediate families) and Kylie Miller and Rob Humble (who don’t) are happy to discuss the blessings supposedly showered upon those for whom medicine is a family business, and how those who aren’t so fortunate can soldier on without those advantages.  Also, the spirit of intellectual curiosity is alive!  Thanks to that–and a twitter hashtag–we learned this week that birds don’t break wind.  Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for a question to consider every week.

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Your Pre-med Clinical Experience Can Cost You Money and Waste Your Time…and Hurt Your Application.

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Photo by mikecogh

Medical school admissions committees look for clinical experiences on applications, so it behooves premeds to seek out ways to get into the clinic as a way of learning about the practice of medicine and to show they are serious about becoming a physician.  But there are clinical experiences that can hurt your application, and the Association of American Medical Colleges want to warn premeds that participation might signal a lack of judgement. Corbin Weaver, Kylie Miller, Teneme Konne, and Levi Endelman give some advice on the ones to avoid.  Meanwhile our president-elect is thinking about creating a ‘commission on autism,’ and may be looking to a well-known anti-vaxxer to head it up.  And a cybersecurity flaw leaves pacemakers and defibrillators wide open to hackers, allowing them to shock patients or drain batteries.  And we find out whether our co-hosts can really understand their patients, even if they speak sdrawkcab.  Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for a question to consider every week.

Continue reading Your Pre-med Clinical Experience Can Cost You Money and Waste Your Time…and Hurt Your Application.

Do Better Because You Will Die Some Day.

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I made them myself! Photo by loveiswritten

John Pienta, Levi Endelman, Kylie Miller, and Adam Erwood get to answer some probing questions: what’s the first thing a student wants to know upon starting a new clerkship?   What’s the most important skill they’ve ever learned? And what medical specialty should Vladimir Putin pursue?  Also–helpful tip for medical students–if you want to perform the best you can, science says you just need to be reminded that one day you will be worm food.  And men seem to be having trouble with the idea of having minor procedures and experiencing side effects in exchange for the privilege of having sex without certain undesirable consequences like babies.  And we discuss the apparent YouTube trend of DIY braces made by 13-year-olds from wires, superglue, and rubber bands. If you can ignore the risks of your face falling off, it’s a real money saver!

Continue reading Do Better Because You Will Die Some Day.