Tag Archives: addiction

Open on Applications about New-Found Sobriety?

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Should a Medical School Applicant Open Up About a Successful Journey to Sobriety?

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Photo by _BuBBy_

Our recent episode on mental illness in medical school generated some listener feedback.  K wrote to say thanks for the honest discussion (our pleasure!), and wondered how open she should be on her medical school application about her journey to sobriety and how it led her to find a love for community service.  Dave’s six (!) co-hosts this week–Kalyn Campbell, Kylie Miller, Levi Endelman, Irene Morcuende, Kaci McCleary, and Laura Quast–agree that it’s a tough question with two answers…the one we’d like to be able to give, and the perhaps more realistic one that acknowledges human nature.

Listener Erica called in wondering how students cope with the challenges of medical school and residency, especially in the context of a mental illness.  And Terel dropped us a line to ask the differences between a hospitalist and an internist.

This Week in Medical News

Groundbreaking research from the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows that alternative medicine is a crappy option for cancer patients‘ survival rates…except for prostate cancer.  And a Chinese startup publishes a study in which CRISPR knocks out pig PERVs.  That’s Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses, silly, and it means if you need an organ transplant one day, you might have to thank a pig for that heart.

We want to hear from you.

Are you ready for your future pig heart?  Who would win in an alpha-gal fight, Kylie or Kalyn? We’d love to hear your thoughts.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

Continue reading Open on Applications about New-Found Sobriety?

Semester Wrap-up, Gramma’s baked, and Short Thoughts

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Mmm-hm, well, I can help but notice you’ve stopped petting me, so prepare for a good clawing. Photo by rainerstropek@yahoo.com

Dave and the crew–Mark Moubarek, Levi Endelman, Julie Gudenkauf, and Erin Pazaski–look back on things they experienced as the semester draws to a close.  As first years, Levi and Erin share their thoughts on entering medical school.  Mark is getting ready for his clerkships to begin.  And Julie has finished up her primary-care clerkships and is moving into exploring some of the more specialized areas of medicine.  We also discuss the not surprising fact that baby-boomers are more into cannabis than their children and grandchildren are.  A scientist has decided that he can find people who are overly susceptible to the placebo effect and screen them out so drug companies can save millions on clinical trials and drugs can get to patients faster.  Meanwhile, some other podcasters who couldn’t join us this week send in their Short Thoughts on American consumerism, a woman that was truly a pioneer in medicine, and cats.  Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for a question to consider every Monday.

Continue reading Semester Wrap-up, Gramma’s baked, and Short Thoughts

The Modern Opioid Epidemic

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Photo by G4GTi

Close your eyes, and picture an opioid abuser. If you’re like me, you see a man in a flophouse or dark alley. He’s cooking up heroin in a spoon over a lighter. Maybe he has a loop of tubing around his upper arm, and he’s shooting the heroin into a vein in the crook of his elbow. Once he’s done with the injection, he leans back with a euphoric sigh. Fade to black.

Maybe it’s just me, but this is the image that, for years, mediated my perception of the opioid epidemic, but it’s a stereotype created by television and movies. Even as a stereotype, it’s outdated, though. For decades, now, much of the epidemic is one of prescription drugs. The CDC says 78 people die from opioid overdoses every day. At least half of all opioid overdoses are from prescription drugs. Meanwhile, deaths from illegally made opioids, like the synthetic Fentanyl which is often mixed with heroin or cocaine to increase the high, increased 80% from 2013 to 2014. The American Society of Addiction Medicine says that prescription pain reliever overdose deaths among women increased more than 400% from 1999 to 2010, compared to 237% among men. In 2014, 168,000 adolescents were addicted to prescription pain medications. More than 2 and a half times that number of kids were taking prescription pain relievers for non-medical uses.

Next week, from September 26 to September 30, 2016, the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine will host the Opioid Overdose Prevention Summit. Second-years med students Sarah Ziegenhorn, Petra Hahn, and Cameron Foreman helped organize the conference, in which students from the Colleges of Medicine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Social Work, Public Health, and Nursing will join together to increase their knowledge and to influence public policy and legislation; personal perspectives; and student advocacy. , Sarah, Petra and Cameron were joined by Assistant Dean Denise Martinez and Nurse Kim Brown, whose son Andy died of an overdose, to talk about the issues of opioid addiction, treatment, and overdose prevention.
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Episode 063: Imposter Syndrome–are we good enough?

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“Trust me: I’m (going to be) a doctor.” Photo by AZAdam

This week we welcome new Short Coat podcaster Caroline Sanderson who, along with Aline Sandouk, Greg Woods, and Kaci McCleary are ready represent the modern medical student. Including the feeling that all medical students get from time when they’re faced with medical school, which is that they are just not good enough. Imposter syndrome, the unrealistic expectations, and maybe the pressure exerted by the newfangled integration of basic and clinical years in medical school may all play into it (special thanks to StudentDoctor.net’s TheNightingale, who unknowingly sparked the discussion with his/her question).

Continue reading Episode 063: Imposter Syndrome–are we good enough?