Tag Archives: Levi Endelman

Real, and Fake, Research Day

public health photo
Photo by Arenamontanus

We’ve got a crowd of M1s in the house rapidly approaching the end of their first year.  This past week, Kylie Jade Miller, Levi Endelman, Adam Erwood, and new co-host Irene Morcuende took their physical exam skills practical exam; and they discussed some research they did at the intersections of medical and society–the public health implications of the American-as-apple-pie cycle of  incarceration, the effects of Medicare expansion have had on access to mental healthcare, what happens when substance abuse sufferers are offered clean needle and Narcan, and whether taxing sugary drinks have an effect on obesity.  Dave, seeing an opportunity to torture his co-hosts, put them through a Pop Quiz: can they discern if the research he presents to them is real or from the depths of Dave’s mind? Kylie uses the occasion to let her secret gunner out.  Listeners, we offer free advice!  Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, or email us at theshortoats@gmail.com.

Continue reading Real, and Fake, Research Day

314 Action: Encouraging People of Science to Make the Leap into Politics

science photo
Photo by soukup

Among the topics we Short Coats often ruminate on is the lack of basic science literacy in the public and press…and among politicians. How did we get to this place when science is so mistrusted?  So Kelsy Adler, Levi Endelman, Lisa Wehr, Marc Toral, and Laura Quast were excited to talk with someone who is doing something about it.  Shaughnessy Naughton is the founder of 314 Action, an organization that seeks to address dearth of science knowledge among politicians directly by encouraging and financing the election of people with STEM backgrounds to public office at all levels.  Shaughnessy Naughton is a chemist by trade and the founder of 314 Action, which “champions electing more leaders to the U.S. Senate, House, State Executive and Legislative offices who come from STEM backgrounds.”   The organization seeks to change politicians’ active resistance to the acquisition of data on things like gun violence and climate change, and push  back on ignorance of the evidence that already exists on topics like vaccinations and evolution.  Among the challenges they face is the perception that science is above politics; the task of creating and financing a network of donors and supporters; and understanding and effectively countering the career politician’s bias toward certainty instead of nuance.  They’re also addressing the need for training people of science to move beyond simple advocacy so that they can engage with the political process and change the system’s anti-science biases from within. Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for occasional Live shows in which you can participate.

Continue reading 314 Action: Encouraging People of Science to Make the Leap into Politics

The Stages of Life: Love, Body Odor, and Body Donation

Love is on the air this week, as Cole Cheney hears a declaration of listener Naomi’s feelings…and then gets a Valentine’s week surprise. Also, Dave, Matt Wilson, Levi Endelman, and newbie Tarek Karam confront the perils of old age (apparently, Dave is emitting 2-Nonenal as we speak).  An article on the lower cost of body donation (as compared to funeral costs) has the group thinking about the contributions their own donors have had on both their education and their understanding of how important it is to do one’s best to honor them.  As Match Week creeps up on us, the potential for confusion is high for US hospitals and residents from countries marked for travel bans/extreme vetting/whatever. To the extent the US healthcare system depends on foreign medical graduates and international medical graduates, there may be trouble ahead. PS: If you’re in the neighborhood of Iowa City, consider entering the UI Doc Dash to support the Iowa City Free Medical Clinic and the University of Iowa Mobile Clinic, both of which deliver free care to the medically under-served.  Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week. Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for a question to consider every Monday.

Continue reading The Stages of Life: Love, Body Odor, and Body Donation

Your Pre-med Clinical Experience Can Cost You Money and Waste Your Time…and Hurt Your Application.

backwards photo
Photo by mikecogh

Medical school admissions committees look for clinical experiences on applications, so it behooves premeds to seek out ways to get into the clinic as a way of learning about the practice of medicine and to show they are serious about becoming a physician.  But there are clinical experiences that can hurt your application, and the Association of American Medical Colleges want to warn premeds that participation might signal a lack of judgement. Corbin Weaver, Kylie Miller, Teneme Konne, and Levi Endelman give some advice on the ones to avoid.  Meanwhile our president-elect is thinking about creating a ‘commission on autism,’ and may be looking to a well-known anti-vaxxer to head it up.  And a cybersecurity flaw leaves pacemakers and defibrillators wide open to hackers, allowing them to shock patients or drain batteries.  And we find out whether our co-hosts can really understand their patients, even if they speak sdrawkcab.  Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for a question to consider every week.

Continue reading Your Pre-med Clinical Experience Can Cost You Money and Waste Your Time…and Hurt Your Application.

Semester Wrap-up, Gramma’s baked, and Short Thoughts

cats photo
Mmm-hm, well, I can help but notice you’ve stopped petting me, so prepare for a good clawing. Photo by rainerstropek@yahoo.com

Dave and the crew–Mark Moubarek, Levi Endelman, Julie Gudenkauf, and Erin Pazaski–look back on things they experienced as the semester draws to a close.  As first years, Levi and Erin share their thoughts on entering medical school.  Mark is getting ready for his clerkships to begin.  And Julie has finished up her primary-care clerkships and is moving into exploring some of the more specialized areas of medicine.  We also discuss the not surprising fact that baby-boomers are more into cannabis than their children and grandchildren are.  A scientist has decided that he can find people who are overly susceptible to the placebo effect and screen them out so drug companies can save millions on clinical trials and drugs can get to patients faster.  Meanwhile, some other podcasters who couldn’t join us this week send in their Short Thoughts on American consumerism, a woman that was truly a pioneer in medicine, and cats.  Listeners, share your thoughts with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and see our Facebook page for a question to consider every Monday.

Continue reading Semester Wrap-up, Gramma’s baked, and Short Thoughts

Do Better Because You Will Die Some Day.

braces photo
I made them myself! Photo by loveiswritten

John Pienta, Levi Endelman, Kylie Miller, and Adam Erwood get to answer some probing questions: what’s the first thing a student wants to know upon starting a new clerkship?   What’s the most important skill they’ve ever learned? And what medical specialty should Vladimir Putin pursue?  Also–helpful tip for medical students–if you want to perform the best you can, science says you just need to be reminded that one day you will be worm food.  And men seem to be having trouble with the idea of having minor procedures and experiencing side effects in exchange for the privilege of having sex without certain undesirable consequences like babies.  And we discuss the apparent YouTube trend of DIY braces made by 13-year-olds from wires, superglue, and rubber bands. If you can ignore the risks of your face falling off, it’s a real money saver!

Continue reading Do Better Because You Will Die Some Day.

Against Logic there is No Armor like Ignorance.

logic photo
Photo by soukup

WHO researchers in Uganda are keen to teach schoolchildren there how to spot dubious health claims. This leads Dave to ask Levi Endelman, John Pienta, and newcomers Alice Ye and Adam Erwood whether their generation was taught the principles of logic and scientific thought in a way more effective than his own generation was taught, while Alice questions the motives of the researchers themselves. On a related note, listener Jake writes in to remind John that even we on The Short Coat Podcast, careful as we are to disclaim any logic whatsoever, should be wary of “shallow/uncontrolled” arguments.  We discuss emerging ideas on treating ICU patients in ways that minimize ICU delirium and PTSD, a problem once known as ICU psychosis, including changing the ways patients are sedated, their environments, the emphasis on convenience for healthcare personnel, and other factors that may be making patients crazy.

Continue reading Against Logic there is No Armor like Ignorance.

Keeping Up With Your Interests and Relationships

hobby photo
Photo by Cooperweb

Stress is a part of medical school.  Worrying about tests, studying until you drop, late nights, early mornings, and drinking from the firehose all seem to promote the idea that med students should do nothing else but study.  Dave, Aditi Patel, Marc Toral, Levi Endelman, and Kylie Miller agree, which is one reason Aditi and Dave put on a monthly Art Club.  Students get together over lunch and have fun with paints, ceramics, drawing, whatever!  No pressure, just an hour away from medicine.

And speaking of being away from medicine, a listener calls into 347-SHORTCT with a question about how best to keep in touch with family and friends who might not understand the demands of medical school.  And we discuss Aditi’s family (who just happen to be the subject of a documentary available on Netflix) and the methods they’re using to select her future husband.  And we play Superfight!

Continue reading Keeping Up With Your Interests and Relationships

They have questions, we have…more questions.

milk bath photo
Photo by CamEvans

Dave, John Pienta, Mark Moubarek, Matt Maves, and Levi Endelman are aware that the world is full of questions.  Nowhere is that more true than on the saddest place on the Internet, Yahoo! Answers. There folks ask the kinds of things that a primary care physician might have to answer.  Is removing a layer of skin with a razor a good way to get rid of acne scars?  What could be the cause of blisters on one’s lips after kissing one’s dog?  How much milk should one use in one’s bath?  There are no stupid questions.

But first, since Matt has returned from a year in Des Moines doing clerkships there, we discuss what that’s been like and the benefits of doing some clerkships outside a more academic setting.  We also discuss the psychiatric disorder pica and the kinds of things people swallow on purpose (or by accident).  Also we talk about drug maker Mylan’s difficulties with, well, everyone after we collectively realized they’re gouging patients who need epinephrine auto-injectors to keep themselves alive.  Meanwhile, a company is offering a supplement that its CEO, a pioneering MIT aging researcher, and it’s Nobel-prize festooned board of scientific advisors say might just be a way to extend the human health span.

Continue reading They have questions, we have…more questions.