Category Archives: Short Coat Podcast

All episodes of the Short Coat Podcast.

What Keenan Can’t Say.

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wash hands photo
Photo by gagilas

Keenan Laraway struggles to comprehend the rules on what you can say on a podcast, while the M1s suffer through their Anatomy and Biochem exams.  Also, Matt Maves, Emily Reynolds, and Holly Van Den Beldt discuss the connection between healthcare staff, hand hygiene, and peer pressure; why parents feed their kids unhealthy foods (hint: it’s not because they don’t know what healthy food is); where superbugs may be hiding in hospitals, and what they’re doing while they’re skulking about; and some questionable dreaming research.

Episode 046: What Keenan Can’t Say.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Research Day!

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medical research photo
Photo by kittenfc

On September 12, the Carver College of Medicine celebrated medical student’s efforts in reseasrch, and what better day than that for a ‘cast featuring student researchers? Cole Cheney hosts David Peters, Ezequiel Brown, Tyler Olson, and Emi Deumic to talk about their efforts in broadening medical knowledge and in learning about the world that researchers inhabit. It’s a fascinating place, and it makes Cole talk funny. Continue reading Research Day!

Peace Be With You, Russian Sex Geckos

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Original image: Gecko, by StudioTempura, Flickr

Nathan Miller and Aline Sandouk return to react and discuss the latest news and info from the world of medicine and medical education.  We say a little prayer for some Russian geckos sent into space for what should have been the time of their lives, but sadly wasn’t. Continue reading Peace Be With You, Russian Sex Geckos

COFFEEEEEE!

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GEP: Starbucks (Detail), Michael Hanscom (Flickr)

This week an overly caffeinated Dave is joined by new podcaster Jordan Harbaugh-Williams, who, along with Cole Cheney, Corbin Weaver, and Aline Sandouk discuss the Midwesterner habit of being polite; the Deeded Body Ceremony; and Cole outs Corbin’s possible run for office in medical school government.  That’s not confirmed, by the way–her spokespeople say she’s currently exploring her options and hasn’t ruled out a campaign.  Also, a drive through pain medicine clinic in Texas is shut down, for some reason.  Tulane opens a teaching kitchen for medical students.  A review of lithopedion cases.  And a Chinese man gets a 3D printed skull implant operation.

Listen to Episode 043: COFFEEEEEEE!.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

The M1s Are All Right

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love me tapeworm! by kaelyn, Flickr

One week of the semester gone, and M1s Aline Sandouk, Ethan Craig, and Nathan Miller report in on their experiences.  Who’s their favorite lecturer?  They won’t say, but they seem to be alive, well, and moving right along. Also, the FDA thinks we should regulate the use of feces as a drug. How an extreme athlete who isn’t a scientist did what she always does–pushes through the pain–to discover her genetic flaw when no-one else could. A company founded by a medical student with a bioengineering background comes up with a smart, simple, easy way to treat a scourge of childbirth in developing countries–postpartum hemorrhage. And a quick plug for The Discover Fit & Health channel which continues its fine tradition of infotainment programming with “Untold Stories of the ER,” featuring a story of a woman who fed her daughter tapeworms to get her ready for that all-important beauty pageant.

Listen to Episode 041: The M1s Are All Right.
Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Orientation Week!

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Compulsory #1 (SUCCESS!), by Jason Epping (Flickr)

This week, first-year medical student Corbin Weaver joins the team, and gives Keenan Laraway the low-down on her orientation week experiences.  We discuss the alleged shady medical theories of Dr. Henry Heimlich (of the eponymous maneuver), a 6-year-old’s MAGEC spine correction treatment, Walmart’s desire to be your primary care doc’s office, and a device that might just revolutionize the transportation of (and therefore the whole process of transplanting) donor organs.

Listen to Episode 041: Orientation Week!.

 Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Finding A Way Out

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Arleta Gang Shooting Investigation by Flickr/Chris Yarzab

In this episode, we meet new Carver College of Medicine Learning Communities Coordinator Megan McDowell, who I shanghaied into being on the show after she’d been on the job only 4 days and 3 hours.  Then Terrance Wong shares a painful moment from his past growing up in Oakland, California, amidst gangs and gang violence, and what he’s trying to do for a pre-medicine student who’s searching for his own exit strategy. What can healthcare professionals do in the face of such upheaval?

Listen to Episode 040: Finding a Way Out of Gang Violence.
Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Fist Bumps, Ebola, and Too Many Teeth

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Updated Bump Sign. Flickr: aaron_anderer

This week, Cole Cheney, Terrance Wong, and Lisa Wehr  marvel at an Indian boy’s odontoma and its many, many, many toothlets.  Also, how to decrease transmission of Ebola by using fist-bumps instead of handshakes and have the hippest clinic in the world all at the same time.  Also, Ebola.  The Second Fittest Woman On Earth hopes to do better, and how the future of pharmacology is imperiled by climate change.

Listen to Episode 039: Fist bumps, Ebola, and Too Many Teeth.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Changing the World Outside the Clinic

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Photo by Paolo MargariDoctors enjoy, for better or worse, and elevated social status.  How can they use that high regard, as well as their knowledge, to change the world when they’re not in the clinic?
In this episode, Alison Pletch, Zeynep Demir, Eric Wilson, and Alison Seline brainstorm some avenues from politics to journalism that docs explore when they have the itch to change the world.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Junk Science

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Junk science dominates our thoughts in this episode, our first recording in front of a live studio audience (the Introduction to Medical Education at Iowa students who were kind enough to join us).  Cole Cheney, Alison Pletch, Keenan Laraway, and Eric Wilson talked about Dr. Mehmet Oz’s recent troubles, including a New York M3 who asked the AMA and the NY Medical Association to step in.  Also, Cole drops some new research knowledge on us about why pot makes people paranoid (hint–having a researcher stand over you asking you if you’re paranoid might be another known cause of paranoia), and The Egyptian Army says it has cured HIV and hepatitis, or so they claim, using a simple point and shoot device that detects AND purifies the blood.   But it needs a leeeeetle more testing…

Listen to Episode 037: Junk Science.
Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.