Tag Archives: listener question

The False Dichotomies in Medical Politics, Physician Lifestyles, and Public Discourse

Share
decision photo
Photo by Steve Webel

This episode is all about false dichotomies–situations or ideas that seem like dilemmas (and thus require a difficult choice to be made) but which really aren’t.   Much of the public discussions of things like the hours that residents work, the funding for medical research, the lifestyles that residents are forced to lead, the choices that prospective medical students make are couched in terms of either/or choices.  Corbin Weaver, Matt Wilson, John Pienta, and Kaci McCleary discuss the alleged dilemmas that we encounter in medicine and medical education, and conclude that these choices are often not mutually exclusive. It is possible to have both shorter hours and safer patient handoffs and quality education, despite rules that seem to indicate otherwise.  It is possible to adequately fund basic science research and fund a sensible national defense, despite presidential budgets that slash NIH funding.  Should listener Justin study during the summer prior to med school to begin medical school on the right foot, or will he struggle if he takes a break to live a little?  And listener Julian is super annoyed at the admissions process. Is his ire justified? Listeners, share your thoughts and questions with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time.

Continue reading The False Dichotomies in Medical Politics, Physician Lifestyles, and Public Discourse

There Will Be No Problems: Confidence and Reassurance

Share
helminth photo
Photo by Sustainable sanitation

On a recent show, Dave opined that shaving one’s armpit hair might cut down on deodorant failure, and a listener called into vindicate him, much to Mark Moubarek’s shame.  Another listener, PharmD and author Tony (he’s written a book you might want to try if you’re looking for “a relaxed approach” to memorizing pharmacology), wants to know how a medical student gets to the point where they can be confident enough to say to a patient, “There will be no problems.” Mark, Amy Young, John Pienta, and newcomer Julie Gudenkauf weigh in on the acquisition of confidence and the art of reassurance.

Continue reading There Will Be No Problems: Confidence and Reassurance

Peeps, Prestige, Presents, and Public Health.

Share
Kaci's gift to Dave, which, after he is fired for being subversive, he will cherish.
Kaci’s gift to Dave, which, after he is fired for being subversive, he will cherish.

Listeners, we’d like to know something about you.  Post a photo of your listening environment anywhere you can use #shortcoatpeeps.  Just watch those reflective surfaces, m’kay? 

Russo and Rob Humble marked the end of their first year on today’s show with Kaci McCleary, with a look back on what they’ve learned about being a medical student that they didn’t know on the way in.  We clear the docket with a couple listener questions that have been hanging fire, starting with listener Claire who writes in to ask: when it comes to choosing a medical school, is a prestigious school somehow better than the others?  Do they open doors for their graduates, and is sacrificing oneself to the gods of hard work in favor of those opportunities a good idea? We are, of course, happy to advise her.  Another listener question, from Jennifer, asked about the career opportunities available to MDs who also have a Master’s of Public Health degree.   Again, happy to help!

Continue reading Peeps, Prestige, Presents, and Public Health.

Recess Rehash: How Residents Cope, and the Costs of America’s Most Violent Sport

Share
nfl photo
Keep those noggins safe. Photo by USCPSC

Oh, snap.  Our recording last week was nuked by the computer gods.  Here’s a re-run to keep your auditory meatus occupied.

What can medical students and residents do to keep their chins up during their training? That’s what listener Ross–who has noticed the contrast between his happy med student co-workers and his crabby resident co-workers–wants to know. John Pienta, Gabe Lancaster, Jake O’Brien, and Matt Becker consider the question and the advice we gathered from residents. Continue reading Recess Rehash: How Residents Cope, and the Costs of America’s Most Violent Sport

Sudden Empathy, Too Much Empathy, and A Lack of Empathy

Share
empathy photo
Photo by Sean MacEntee

Poor lister Erin. She writes to let us know she can’t find the first 44 episodes of the show, now that she’s listened to all eighty(!) of those available on iTunes. We explain how she can fill the sad hole in her life this tragedy has left. Dave’s shower thoughts lead Aline Sandouk, Amy Young, Marc Toral and Kaci McCleary to discuss the utility of giving not a single feldercarb what people think of you. On the flip side, an article in the New York Times offers a peek at what can happen if you go from not caring (or even knowing) what people think to caring all too much, when transcranial magnetic stimulation suddenly enables an autistic man to understand what others are thinking of him.
Continue reading Sudden Empathy, Too Much Empathy, and A Lack of Empathy

Post-acceptance anxiety, Match stats, and backup plans.

Share
impostor photo
You are not an impostor. Photo by stevevoght

Listener Oscar called in to find out what should he do about his case of nerves now that he’s been accepted  to medical school, and Lisa Wehr, Aline Sandouk, Marc Toral, and Dylan Todd have plenty of calming words for him.  They also discuss the statistics of 2016’s Match, why some people don’t match (do whatever it takes, ethically, to get good exam scores, people), and what people who don’t end up matching can do with their MD.  Some schools have even begun offering built-in backup plans for those folks.

Continue reading Post-acceptance anxiety, Match stats, and backup plans.

How Residents Cope, and the Costs of America’s Most Violent Sport

Share
nfl photo
Keep those noggins safe. Photo by USCPSC

What can medical students and residents do to keep their chins up during their training? That’s what listener Ross–who has noticed the contrast between his happy med student co-workers and his crabby resident co-workers–wants to know. John Pienta, Gabe Lancaster, Jake O’Brien, and Matt Becker consider the question and the advice we gathered from residents. Continue reading How Residents Cope, and the Costs of America’s Most Violent Sport