Tag Archives: genetically modified babies

Genetically Engineered Babies, Medical Student Influencers

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Are you buying what med student Instagrammers are selling?

genetically engineered photo
Photo by MillionsAgainstMonsanto

You’ve probably noticed them.  Cute med students hawking makeup and study guides on Instagram, posting photos of their fav study beverage, and composing carefully arranged shots of the contents of their backpacks, #medstudentlife #sponsored.  Well, who can blame them–med school’s expensive!  But is it a slippery slope, just waiting for some unsuspecting student to lose their ethical footing?  Short Coats Sam Palmer, Miranda Schene and newbies Allie Fillman and Allison Klimesh take a look.

This Week in Medical News

Funny thing:  that stuff you learned about mitochondria?  Wrong.  And with the news that there are now real live genetically engineered babies in the world–thanks to a Chinese scientist with his own ethical problems–we wonder why it was even necessary, what the dangers are to the family who ‘benefited,’ and just where the heck is this young mad scientist, now, anyway?

We Want to Hear From You

Would you be a med student influencer if you could?  Why, and what limits would you set? Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.  Do all three!

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Recess Rehash: Here’s Lemons In Your Eyes

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lemon eye photo
You shall pay. Photo by ezhikoff

[Since Dave and the Writing and Humanities Program was putting on an art-and-medicine conference last week, we’re posting this rerun.  Enjoy!]

Dave helps Mark Moubarek, Amy Young, Rob Humble, and Corbin Weaver to practice their clinical skills by  answering random people’s “health” questions from the saddest place on the Internet. But first we discuss the AMA’s policy to support the ban on direct to consumer advertising of drugs and implantable devices, and how such advertising makes the doctor-patient relationship complicated. Will drug companies retaliate by advocating for bans on advertising doctors and hospitals to patients.  Researchers in the UK may be about to get the green light to edit the genes of human embryos seeking answers to why some miscarriages happen.  Are we approaching the slippery slope?

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Here’s Lemons In Your Eyes

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lemon eye photo
You shall pay. Photo by ezhikoff

Dave helps Mark Moubarek, Amy Young, Rob Humble, and Corbin Weaver to practice their clinical skills by  answering random people’s “health” questions from the saddest place on the Internet. But first we discuss the AMA’s policy to support the ban on direct to consumer advertising of drugs and implantable devices, and how such advertising makes the doctor-patient relationship complicated. Will drug companies retaliate by advocating for bans on advertising doctors and hospitals to patients.  Researchers in the UK may be about to get the green light to edit the genes of human embryos seeking answers to why some miscarriages happen.  Are we approaching the slippery slope?

Continue reading Here’s Lemons In Your Eyes

Human Hamburger Meat

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mayor mccheese photo
Photo by Logan Donahoo

Matt gets in touch with a question:  does a mediocre academic history automatically destroy med school aspirations, or are there ways to fix that?  There are, and Amy A’hearn of our admissions office gives Matt a path to follow.  Lisa Wehr and Matt Maves discuss apps that seek to help poor people, a UK chef creating ‘human meat burgers’ to promote a popular television show (with recipe, so be sure to save this one for your next Walking Dead premiere party), and a special shout out to the first genetically modified babies, who are graduating high school in the coming year.  Please use your superpowers responsibly.

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The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.