Tag Archives: diabetes

Why You Might Want to Wait to Apply to Medschool

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Your Med School Application is Too Important to Rush

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Don’t look for a reason this image is here. I just liked it. Photo by Dominic’s pics

Listener Hanna wrote in to ask an important question: is it better to apply this year despite possibly ending up in the second tier of applicants due to a late MCAT score, or should she just wait until next year?  Good question, Hannah!  Aline Sandouk, Irisa Mahaparn, Tony Rosenberg, and admissions counselor Dan Schnall (in absentia) have the answer.

Another listener, Amari (and we hope we’ve spelled that right), phoned in to the Short Coats Hotline to find out if there is a medical school equivalent to the infamous Freshman 15 many undergrads suffer through, and if so, what she could do about it when she starts her journey in medical education.

Med students aren’t, in general, known for being good liars; they tend to be a pretty ethical bunch.  But perhaps they suspend their morality enough to fool each other with lies about their time in medical school.  We’ll see about that, as they play Two Truths and a Lie.

We’re still giving away keyfobs if you post a review somewhere and send a screenshot to theshortcoats@gmail.com, and we’ve begun collecting recipes for our future Recipes for Med School Success cookbook.

This Week in Medical News

Researchers discover what might be a vaccine to treat diabetes…and it’s already in use around the world, though not in the US.  And the US Supreme Court ‘s decision  to uphold the most recent version of Trump’s travel ban won’t hurt patients seeking medical attention at all, unless they need a geriatrician, nephrologist, cardiologist, internist, critical care specialist, nurse, medical technician…hmm, that seems like rather a lot.

We Want to Hear From You

Do you need advice?  Do you have questions about medical school?  Call us at 347-SHORTCT anytime, visit our Facebook group, or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

Continue reading Why You Might Want to Wait to Apply to Medschool

Premeds Can Be Science Podcasters, ft. Terel Jackson

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Medical and Premedical students should definitely podcast

A picture of Pre-med Podcaster Terel Jackson
Pre-med Podcaster Terel Jackson

An unstated goal of ours is to show medical learners that podcasting is a beneficial experience for both listeners and hosts,  and we’re always banging on about the need for better science communicators.  So Erin Pazaski, Levi Endelman, Kylie Miller, and Irene Morcuende were recently excited to get an email from Terel Jackson, an OSU premed who said she had gotten the message and started her podcast!  Her show, Health Science (For The Rest of Us), takes “a super practical look at the body, its shenanigans, and the world of fascinating ways we try to keep it healthy.”  Of course, we had to have her on the show to tell us all about her adventures in radiation, body odor, neti pots, and more.  She also has some tips for people who want to make podcasting a part of their journey to medical school and beyond.

This week in science and medicine news

Also, we discuss new research showing how Americans’ lifespans vary widely by up to 20 years from county to county. Plus, the unusual prescription one PA hospital writes to save diabetic patients an average of $24,000 a year.

We want to hear from you

Listeners, share your suggestions with us each week.  Call us at 347-SHORTCT any time, and email theshortcoats@gmail.com.

Continue reading Premeds Can Be Science Podcasters, ft. Terel Jackson

The Twin Epidemics: Our Changing Understanding of Diabetes and Obesity

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A portrait of Dr. Dale Abel and Dr. Miguel Lopez
Dale Abel, MD, PhD (left) and Miguel Lopez, PhD.

Eric Wilson, Aline Sandouk, and Taz Khalid are here to introduce two of the people fighting world-wide epidemics: Diabetes and Obesity. Endocrinologist Dr. Dale Abel is the director of the University of Iowa Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center. The Diabetes Research Center recently invited Dr. Miguel Lopez to come from Spain, where he is a professor of physiology at the University of Santiago De Compostela. He coordinates the NeurObesity research group at the Center for Research in Molecular Medicine and Chronic Diseases; his field of knowledge is the hypothalamic regulation of energy balance. We got to talk to them about the current state of research in diabetes and obesity, and the prospects for a paradigm shift in how we treat them.
Continue reading The Twin Epidemics: Our Changing Understanding of Diabetes and Obesity

Episode 092: Fried Lard on a Stick in a Cup

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Brought to you by…State Fairs: We Make French Fries Seem Healthy! Photo by Brett Jordan

Kaci McCleary, Cory Christensen and Tae Kim are excited to experience Iowa State Fair food, which is arguably responsible for a large percentage of Iowa’s dead people.  Enjoy your nacho balls and other crunchy spheres, bacon and brisket explosions, and fried food-that-used-to-be-good-for-you-until-they-fried-it on a stick.  We also talk about The Atlantic’s article about what babies undergrads are about touchy subjects, which just annoys Kaci, who thinks this is a media-manufactured trend.

Continue reading Episode 092: Fried Lard on a Stick in a Cup

Episode 063: Imposter Syndrome–are we good enough?

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“Trust me: I’m (going to be) a doctor.” Photo by AZAdam

This week we welcome new Short Coat podcaster Caroline Sanderson who, along with Aline Sandouk, Greg Woods, and Kaci McCleary are ready represent the modern medical student. Including the feeling that all medical students get from time when they’re faced with medical school, which is that they are just not good enough. Imposter syndrome, the unrealistic expectations, and maybe the pressure exerted by the newfangled integration of basic and clinical years in medical school may all play into it (special thanks to StudentDoctor.net’s TheNightingale, who unknowingly sparked the discussion with his/her question).

Continue reading Episode 063: Imposter Syndrome–are we good enough?