Tag Archives: Cole Cheney

Celebrity Look-Alikes

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lungfish photo
Oh, this? It’s my internal pet. Photo by The British Library
Corbin Weaver, Kaci McCleary, Lisa Wehr, Greg Woods, Ben Quarshie and Cole Cheney were all available for podcasting this week, so I match them with their celebrity look-alikes. Also, we announce an internship for Iowa pre-meds, something we’re very excited about. We talk about Brittany Maynard’s decision to move to Oregon so that she could be in a position to end her suffering from glioblastoma by taking advantage of Oregon’s Death with Dignity law. Continue reading Celebrity Look-Alikes

Silent but Therapeutic

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Oh, cheer up, Melinda. Your cancer is cured! Photo by bradleygee

This week on The Short Coat Podcast, Lisa Wehr, Cole Cheney, Zhi Xiong, and Greg Woods are back with this week’s completely inadvertent theme: odoriferous treatments.  Also we talk about how medical students do a lot of staring at the bark and missing the trees, and the scandalous and sexist mnemonics used in medical school for all that bark staring.  Dave looks forward to the delivery of his iPad Air 2 and ditching his 2010 iPad 2 because iOS 8 destroyed it.  U2’s Bono reveals that his silly glasses are a treatment for his glaucoma, making everyone feel bad for thinking he was just trying and failing to look cool. There is a evolutionary reason for the thick male skull, which seems to coincide with the appearance of The Three Stooges on the fossil record. Cole reveals he’s a beta male as evidenced by his reaction to blood draws, and how this reaction perpetuates the survival of the species. A British man fakes a 2-year coma to avoid court. Proposals for a robot force to deal with Ebola.  The University of Exeter isolates a compound from the smell of flatulence that they think will treat diseases that are mediated by damage to mitochondria. Researchers peg when adult humans gained lactase and thus the ability to process milk, and as a result we are thankful that Lisa grew up on a dairy farm and explains why and how adults grew to do that.  Scientists discover that our skin contains odor receptors, and a man with a spinal injury gets cells from his olfactory bulb transplanted into his spine and regains motion and sensation.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

“The Cheese Slid Off My Cracker”

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cheese cracker photo
Photo by @davestone

It’s our 50th episode, and students Lisa Wehr, Matt Maves, Greg Woods, Cole Cheney, and Deep Bhat are on hand, and admissions recruiter Amy A’hearn stops by to address a listener’s Moment of Truth: are overseas medical mission trips still a good idea when you’re looking to add a little something to your CV as you prepare to apply to med school? She says, sure, but there are some gotchas you need to know about. Also, Facebook and Apple cover the costs for female employees to freeze their eggs. The first baby born from a transplanted uterus is doing fine. Withdrawal symptoms due to a Google Glass addiction are mistaken for alcohol withdrawal. Breast cancer awareness campaigns—are they trivializing with humor a serious disease? A woman’s “cheese slid off her cracker,” resulting in a fugue state that lasts 2400 miles, but shows that people are still looking out for each other. A berry’s juice, applied to some cancers, make them disappear, but (because Mother Nature hates us) it’s a pretty rare berry. Long Islanders’ are becoming allergic to red meat due to tick bites. We succumb to the Ebola coverage epidemic raging through America.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Terrence Holt interview audio only

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smjHaving a little trouble with iTunes, so I’m posting this to (try to) make sure listeners get our discussion with Dr. Holt delivered to their iDevices properly. See the previously posted episode description here. I hope this works!

A Doctor’s Story with Terrence Holt

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Terrence Holt, MD
Terrence Holt, MD

On this week’s show, Dr. Terrence Holt, author of Internal Medicine: A Doctor’s Stories visits with Writing and Humanities Program Director Jason Lewis, and students Cole Cheney, Ethan Forsgren, Aline Sandouk, and a studio audience. Dr. Holt is a geriatrician at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.  His book is about residency, and is an exploration of how doctors find the compassion and strength to care about their work and patients.  The first chapter,  “A Sign of Weakness,” takes us through an inexperienced doctor’s confrontation of his own helplessness against the impending death of his patient.  You may want to read it before you listen. (Look for the link below the audio player.)

 Dr. Holt has a lot to offer med students in terms of wisdom.  How having a deep and thoughtful appreciation of your own humanity helps If you’re going to practice medicine humanely.  The role doubt plays in the life of a doc, and the fact that If you’re not having doubt multiple times in the course of a day, you’re not paying close enough attention.  The things that keep him going as a doctor and as a writer. How the connection between writer and reader gives writers advantages that other kinds of artists may not have. And using literature as a way of getting the kinds of experience that you wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

Episode 048: A Doctor’s Story with Terrence Holt

Excerpt: Internal Medicine: A Doctor’s Stories, “A Sign of Weakness”

Excerpted from Internal Medicine: A Doctor’s Stories by Terrence Holt. Copyright © 2014 by Terrence Holt. With permission of the publisher, Liveright Publishing Corporation. All rights reserved

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Research Day!

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Photo by kittenfc

On September 12, the Carver College of Medicine celebrated medical student’s efforts in reseasrch, and what better day than that for a ‘cast featuring student researchers? Cole Cheney hosts David Peters, Ezequiel Brown, Tyler Olson, and Emi Deumic to talk about their efforts in broadening medical knowledge and in learning about the world that researchers inhabit. It’s a fascinating place, and it makes Cole talk funny. Continue reading Research Day!

COFFEEEEEE!

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GEP: Starbucks (Detail), Michael Hanscom (Flickr)

This week an overly caffeinated Dave is joined by new podcaster Jordan Harbaugh-Williams, who, along with Cole Cheney, Corbin Weaver, and Aline Sandouk discuss the Midwesterner habit of being polite; the Deeded Body Ceremony; and Cole outs Corbin’s possible run for office in medical school government.  That’s not confirmed, by the way–her spokespeople say she’s currently exploring her options and hasn’t ruled out a campaign.  Also, a drive through pain medicine clinic in Texas is shut down, for some reason.  Tulane opens a teaching kitchen for medical students.  A review of lithopedion cases.  And a Chinese man gets a 3D printed skull implant operation.

Listen to Episode 043: COFFEEEEEEE!.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

The M1s Are All Right

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love me tapeworm! by kaelyn, Flickr

One week of the semester gone, and M1s Aline Sandouk, Ethan Craig, and Nathan Miller report in on their experiences.  Who’s their favorite lecturer?  They won’t say, but they seem to be alive, well, and moving right along. Also, the FDA thinks we should regulate the use of feces as a drug. How an extreme athlete who isn’t a scientist did what she always does–pushes through the pain–to discover her genetic flaw when no-one else could. A company founded by a medical student with a bioengineering background comes up with a smart, simple, easy way to treat a scourge of childbirth in developing countries–postpartum hemorrhage. And a quick plug for The Discover Fit & Health channel which continues its fine tradition of infotainment programming with “Untold Stories of the ER,” featuring a story of a woman who fed her daughter tapeworms to get her ready for that all-important beauty pageant.

Listen to Episode 041: The M1s Are All Right.
Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Fist Bumps, Ebola, and Too Many Teeth

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Updated Bump Sign. Flickr: aaron_anderer

This week, Cole Cheney, Terrance Wong, and Lisa Wehr  marvel at an Indian boy’s odontoma and its many, many, many toothlets.  Also, how to decrease transmission of Ebola by using fist-bumps instead of handshakes and have the hippest clinic in the world all at the same time.  Also, Ebola.  The Second Fittest Woman On Earth hopes to do better, and how the future of pharmacology is imperiled by climate change.

Listen to Episode 039: Fist bumps, Ebola, and Too Many Teeth.

Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.

Junk Science

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Junk science dominates our thoughts in this episode, our first recording in front of a live studio audience (the Introduction to Medical Education at Iowa students who were kind enough to join us).  Cole Cheney, Alison Pletch, Keenan Laraway, and Eric Wilson talked about Dr. Mehmet Oz’s recent troubles, including a New York M3 who asked the AMA and the NY Medical Association to step in.  Also, Cole drops some new research knowledge on us about why pot makes people paranoid (hint–having a researcher stand over you asking you if you’re paranoid might be another known cause of paranoia), and The Egyptian Army says it has cured HIV and hepatitis, or so they claim, using a simple point and shoot device that detects AND purifies the blood.   But it needs a leeeeetle more testing…

Listen to Episode 037: Junk Science.
Listen to more great shows for medical students on The Vocalis Podcast Network.

The opinions expressed in this feed and podcast are not those of the University of Iowa or the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine.